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HUD Secretary Fudge to Speak at 2021 Just Economy Conference

Other speakers include U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Sherrod Brown, Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome Powell and Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Marcia Fudge will be a featured speaker at the 2021 Just Economy Conference, which will be held online beginning May 3. Other confirmed speakers include U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Sherrod Brown, Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome Powell and Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones.

The Just Economy Conference, organized by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC), is the national event for community, policy, government, business and foundation leaders working toward a just economy that not only promises but delivers to all Americans opportunities to build wealth and live well.

The conference will also feature dozens of panel discussions and lightning talks on how to make the nation more equitable and just than it was before the COVID-19 pandemic, with local practitioners and national experts focused on banking, housing, healthcare, education, philanthropy, fintechs, small business, community development, journalism and other topics. The conference schedule also includes online networking opportunities to help attendees meet and exchange ideas.

“We’re honored Secretary Fudge will join our fantastic lineup of speakers to lead vital conversations around economic justice and the nation’s recovery and revival after the pandemic,” said NCRC CEO Jesse Van Tol. “HUD will play a key role in ensuring the nation’s investments and approaches are equitable and targeted to communities and individuals most in need, and in how the Biden Administration addresses daunting problems that plagued the nation before the pandemic, like the lingering effects of historic redlining and the lack of affordable housing.”

Learn more about the conference and register: www.ncrc.org/conference/

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Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

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